Unusual Adverse Events in a Patient With BRAF-Mutated Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With BRAF/MEK Inhibition

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Rohan Maniar Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

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Stephanie M. Gallitano Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

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Sameera Husain Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

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Golnaz Moazami Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
Harkness Eye Center, New York, New York

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Michael J. Weiss Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
Harkness Eye Center, New York, New York

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Catherine A. Shu Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

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BRAF/MEK inhibition remains standard of care for treatment of BRAF-mutated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although common adverse events (AEs) have been reported through clinical trials and ongoing clinical practice, only a handful of reports have detailed unusual adverse events associated with these medications. This report presents a patient with BRAF-mutated NSCLC treated with dabrafenib and trametinib who experienced 2 unusual AEs—Sweet syndrome and MEK-associated retinopathy—that responded to steroid treatment. The patient was able to continue BRAF/MEK inhibition through a coordinated multidisciplinary approach. This case highlights the importance for all clinicians to recognize unusual AEs associated with BRAF/MEK inhibition, particularly in the setting of expanded use for all BRAF V600E–mutated solid tumors.

Submitted June 27, 2022; final revision received September 23, 2022; accepted for publication September 29, 2022. Published online February 9, 2023.

Disclosures: Dr. Shu has disclosed serving on an advisory board for AstraZeneca, Genentech, Janssen, and Mirati Therapeutics. The remaining authors have disclosed that they have not received any financial consideration from any person or organization to support the preparation, analysis, results, or discussion of this article.

Correspondence: Catherine A. Shu, MD, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10032. Email: cas2145@cumc.columbia.edu
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