Helping Cancer Survivors Return to Work

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Amye J. Tevaarwerk
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Work limitations due to health problems can range from mild or transient limitations to persistent, long‐term dysfunction and can lead to employment instability, underemployment, and even loss of employment. In fact, compared with a healthy matched control population, cancer survivors are 1.37 times more likely to be unemployed. Because patients with metastatic disease are particularly vulnerable, proactive discussion regarding the potential impact of treatment on employment and work outcomes may be beneficial. However, employment and financial toxicity are not topics that clinicians are necessarily trained to address. Financial counselors or patient navigators may be better able to offer a personalized approach and help survivors navigate the complex resources that are involved. Additional research into cancer‐related work outcomes is needed.

Disclosures: Dr. Tevaarwerk has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Correspondence: Amye J. Tevaarwerk, MD, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, WIMR 6037, Madison, WI 53705. Email: at4@medicine.wisc.edu
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