NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Melanoma: Cutaneous, Version 2.2021

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

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  • 1 Stanford Cancer Institute;
  • 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance;
  • 3 University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center;
  • 4 Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center;
  • 5 UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center;
  • 6 Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center;
  • 7 UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center;
  • 8 Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center;
  • 9 University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center;
  • 10 Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine;
  • 11 St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center;
  • 12 Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital;
  • 13 Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute;
  • 14 Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah;
  • 15 AIM at Melanoma;
  • 16 O'Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB;
  • 17 Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center;
  • 18 Mayo Clinic Cancer Center;
  • 19 Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania;
  • 20 The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute;
  • 21 The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins;
  • 22 University of Colorado Cancer Center;
  • 23 City of Hope National Medical Center;
  • 24 Fox Chase Cancer Center;
  • 25 Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center;
  • 26 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center;
  • 27 Duke Cancer Institute;
  • 28 UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center;
  • 29 Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center;
  • 30 Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University;
  • 31 Moffitt Cancer Center; and
  • 32 National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
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Over the past few years, the NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma: Cutaneous have been expanded to include pathways for treatment of microscopic satellitosis (added in v2.2020), and the following Principles sections: Molecular Testing (added in v2.2019), Systemic Therapy Considerations (added in v2.2020), and Brain Metastases Management (added in v3.2020). The v1.2021 update included additional modifications of these sections and notable revisions to Principles of: Pathology, Surgical Margins for Wide Excision of Primary Melanoma, Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy, Completion/Therapeutic Lymph Node Dissection, and Radiation Therapy. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the important changes to pathology and surgery recommendations, as well as additions to systemic therapy options for patients with advanced disease.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplemental Materials (PDF 128 KB)
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