Current Insights: Evolving Principles and Controversies of Cancer Risk Assessment and Management of Hereditary Cancers

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With the introduction of panel and direct-to-consumer testing, genetic testing has become commonplace in recent years, paving the way for both increased awareness around prevalent genetic cancer risks, and also an onslaught of misinformation. At the NCCN 2020 Virtual Annual Conference, Dr. Tuya Pal led a panel of experts in discussing the utility and difficulties associated with multigene testing, the emerging role of moderate-penetrance genes in defining risks for hereditary cancer, and the controversies associated with direct-to-consumer genetic testing services.

Disclosures: Dr. Domchek has disclosed that she has received honoraria from AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP. Mr. Pilarski, Dr. Weiss, and Dr. Pal have disclosed that they have no financial interests, arrangements, affiliations, or commercial interests with the manufacturers of any products discussed in this article or their competitors.

Correspondence: Robert Pilarski, MS, LGC, MSW, Ohio State University, Division of Human Genetics, 2012 Kenny Road, Columbus, OH 43221. Email: robert.pilarski@osumc.edu; Jennifer M. Weiss, MD, MS, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1685 Highland Avenue, Room 4200, Madison, WI 53705. Email: jmw@medicine.wisc.edu; Susan M. Domchek, MD, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, 10-150 South PCAM, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Email: susan.domchek@pennmedicine.upenn.edu; and Tuya Pal, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Ave South, Suite 2500, Nashville, TN 37212. Email: tuya.pal@vumc.org
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