Cancer in People Living With HIV, Version 1.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

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People living with HIV (PLWH) are diagnosed with cancer at an increased rate over the general population and generally have a higher mortality due to delayed diagnoses, advanced cancer stage, comorbidities, immunosuppression, and cancer treatment disparities. Lack of guidelines and provider education has led to substandard cancer care being offered to PLWH. To fill that gap, the NCCN Guidelines for Cancer in PLWH were developed; they provide treatment recommendations for PLWH who develop non–small cell lung cancer, anal cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, and cervical cancer. In addition, the NCCN Guidelines outline advice regarding HIV management during cancer therapy; drug–drug interactions between antiretroviral treatments and cancer therapies; and workup, radiation therapy, surgical management, and supportive care in PLWH who have cancer.

Please Note

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) are a statement of consensus of the authors regarding their views of currently accepted approaches to treatment. Any clinician seeking to apply or consult the NCCN Guidelines® is expected to use independent medical judgment in the context of individual clinical circumstances to determine any patient's care or treatment. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) makes no representation or warranties of any kind regarding their content, use, or application and disclaims any responsibility for their applications or use in any way.

© National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018, All rights reserved. The NCCN Guidelines and the illustrations herein may not be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of NCCN.

Disclosures for the NCCN Cancer in People Living With HIV Panel

At the beginning of each NCCN Guidelines panel meeting, panel members review all potential conflicts of interest. NCCN, in keeping with its commitment to public transparency, publishes these disclosures for panel members, staff, and NCCN itself.

Individual disclosures for the NCCN Cancer in People Living With HIV Panel members can be found on page 1017. (The most recent version of these guidelines and accompanying disclosures are available on the NCCN Web site at NCCN.org.)

These guidelines are also available on the Internet. For the latest update, visit NCCN.org.

NCCN Cancer in People Living With HIV Panel Members

*Erin Reid, MD/Co-Chair‡

UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center

*Gita Suneja, MD/Co-Chair§

Duke Cancer Institute

*Richard F. Ambinder, MD, PhD†

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

Kevin Ard, MD, MPHΦÞ

Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

Robert Baiocchi, MD, PhD†

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute

*Stefan K. Barta, MD, MS, MRCP†‡Þ

Fox Chase Cancer Center

*Evie Carchman, MD¶

University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center

Adam Cohen, MD†

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Neel Gupta, MD†

Stanford Cancer Institute

*Kimberly L. Johung, MD, PhD§

Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital

Ann Klopp, MD, PhD§

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Ann S. LaCasce, MD†

Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center

Chi Lin, MD§

Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center

Oxana V. Makarova-Rusher, MD†

University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center

Amitkumar Mehta, MD‡

University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center

*Manoj P. Menon, MD, MPH†

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

David Morgan, MD‡

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Nitya Nathwani, MD‡

City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center

*Ariela Noy, MD‡

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Frank Palella, MD

Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University

*Lee Ratner, MD, PhD†Þ

Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine

Stacey Rizza, MDΦ

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

*Michelle A. Rudek, PhD, PharmDΣ

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

Jeff Taylor¥

HIV + Aging Research Project - Palm Springs

Benjamin Tomlinson, MD†‡

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute

*Chia-Ching J. Wang, MD†

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

NCCN Staff: Mary A. Dwyer, MS, and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass, PhD

*Discussion Section Writing Committee

Specialties: †Medical Oncology; ‡Hematology/Hematology Oncology; §Radiotherapy/Radiation Oncology; ¶Surgery/Surgical Oncology; ÞInternal Medicine; ΣPharmacology/Pharmacy; ΦInfectious Diseases; ¥Patient Advocacy

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