The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Rectal Cancer address diagnosis, staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, disease surveillance, and survivorship in patients with rectal cancer. This portion of the guidelines focuses on the management of localized disease, which involves careful patient selection for curative-intent treatment options that sequence multimodality therapy usually comprised of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgical resection.

Please NoteThe NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) are a statement of consensus of the authors regarding their views of currently accepted approaches to treatment. Any clinician seeking to apply or consult the NCCN Guidelines® is expected to use independent medical judgment in the context of individual clinical circumstances to determine any patient's care or treatment. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) makes no representation or warranties of any kind regarding their content, use, or application and disclaims any responsibility for their applications or use in any way. The full NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer are not printed in this issue of JNCCN but can be accessed online at NCCN.org.© National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018, All rights reserved. The NCCN Guidelines and the illustrations herein may not be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of NCCN.
Disclosures for the NCCN Rectal Cancer PanelAt the beginning of each NCCN Guidelines panel meeting, panel members review all potential conflicts of interest. NCCN, in keeping with its commitment to public transparency, publishes these disclosures for panel members, staff, and NCCN itself.Individual disclosures for the NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel members can be found on page 901. (The most recent version of these guidelines and accompanying disclosures are available on the NCCN Web site at NCCN.org.)These guidelines are also available on the Internet. For the latest update, visit NCCN.org.
NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel Members*Al B. Benson III, MD/Chair†Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University*Alan P. Venook, MD/Vice-Chair†‡UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer CenterMahmoud M. Al-Hawary, MDфUniversity of Michigan Rogel Cancer CenterLynette Cederquist, MDÞUC San Diego Moores Cancer CenterYi-Jen Chen, MD, PhD§City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer CenterKristen K. Ciombor, MD†Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterStacey Cohen, MD†Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care AllianceHarry S. Cooper, MD≠Fox Chase Cancer CenterDustin Deming, MD†University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer CenterPaul F. Engstrom, MD†Fox Chase Cancer CenterJean L. Grem, MD†Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer CenterAxel Grothey, MD†Mayo Clinic Cancer CenterHoward S. Hochster, MD†Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer HospitalSarah Hoffe, MD§Moffitt Cancer CenterSteven Hunt, MD¶Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of MedicineAhmed Kamel, MDфUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer CenterNatalie Kirilcuk, MD¶Stanford Cancer InstituteSmitha Krishnamurthi, MD†ÞCase Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer InstituteWells A. Messersmith, MD†University of Colorado Cancer CenterJeffrey Meyerhardt, MD, MPH†Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteMary F. Mulcahy, MD‡†Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern UniversityJames D. Murphy, MD, MS§UC San Diego Moores Cancer CenterSteven Nurkin, MD, MS¶Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer CenterLeonard Saltz, MD†‡ÞMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterSunil Sharma, MD†Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of UtahDavid Shibata, MD¶St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science CenterJohn M. Skibber, MD¶The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterConstantinos T. Sofocleous, MD, PhD, FSIR, FCIRSEфMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterElena M. Stoffel, MD, MPH¤University of Michigan Rogel Cancer CenterEden Stotsky-Himelfarb, BSN, RN¥The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns HopkinsChristopher G. Willett, MD§Duke Cancer InstituteEvan Wuthrick, MD§The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research InstituteNCCN Staff: Deborah A. Freedman-Cass, PhD; Kristina M. Gregory, RN, MSN, OCN; and Lisa Gurski, PhD*Discussion Section Writing CommitteeSpecialties: †Medical Oncology; §Radiotherapy/Radiation Oncology; ¶Surgery/Surgical Oncology; ≠Pathology; ‡Hematology/Hematology Oncology; ÞInternal Medicine; фDiagnostic/Interventional Radiology; ¤Gastroenterology; ¥Patient Advocate
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