Survivorship, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

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The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment to help healthcare professionals who work with survivors of adult-onset cancer in the posttreatment period. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding the management of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and lymphedema. In addition, recommendations regarding immunizations and the prevention of infections in cancer survivors are included.

Please Note

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) are a statement of consensus of the authors regarding their views of currently accepted approaches to treatment. Any clinician seeking to apply or consult the NCCN Guidelines® is expected to use independent medical judgment in the context of individual clinical circumstances to determine any patient's care or treatment. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) makes no representation or warranties of any kind regarding their content, use, or application and disclaims any responsibility for their applications or use in any way. The full NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship are not printed in this issue of JNCCN but can be accessed online at NCCN.org.

© National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018, All rights reserved. The NCCN Guidelines and the illustrations herein may not be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of NCCN.

Disclosures for the NCCN Survivorship Panel

At the beginning of each NCCN Guidelines panel meeting, panel members review all potential conflicts of interest. NCCN, in keeping with its commitment to public transparency, publishes these disclosures for panel members, staff, and NCCN itself.

Individual disclosures for the NCCN Survivorship Panel members can be found on page 1247. (The most recent version of these guidelines and accompanying disclosures are available on the NCCN Web site at NCCN.org.)

These guidelines are also available on the Internet. For the latest update, visit NCCN.org.

NCCN Survivorship Panel Members

*Crystal S. Denlinger, MD/Chair†

Fox Chase Cancer Center

Tara Sanft, MD/Vice-Chair†Þ

Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital

K. Scott Baker, MD, MS€ξ

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

*Gregory Broderick, MDω

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, PhD, RD≅

University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center

Debra L. Friedman, MD, MS€‡†

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

*Mindy Goldman, MDΩ

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Melissa Hudson, MD€‡†

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Nazanin Khakpour, MD¶

Moffitt Cancer Center

Allison King, MD€ψ‡†

Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine

Divya Koura, MD‡

UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center

Robin M. Lally, PhD, RN, MS#

Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center

Terry S. Langbaum, MAS¥

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

Allison L. McDonough, MD

Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

Michelle Melisko, MD†£

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

*Jose G. Montoya, MDΦ

Stanford Cancer Institute

Kathi Mooney, RN, PhD#†

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

*Javid J. Moslehi, MDλÞ

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Tracey O'Connor, MD†

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Linda Overholser, MD, MPHÞ

University of Colorado Cancer Center

*Electra D. Paskett, PhDε

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute

Jeffrey Peppercorn, MD, MPH†

Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

William Pirl, MDθ

Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center

M. Alma Rodriguez, MD‡†Þ

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Kathryn J. Ruddy, MD, MPH‡†

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

Paula Silverman, MD†

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute

Sophia Smith, PhD, MSW£

Duke Cancer Institute

*Karen L. Syrjala, PhDθ£

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

Amye Tevaarwerk, MD‡

University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center

*Susan G. Urba, MD†£

University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center

Mark T. Wakabayashi, MD, MPHΩ

City of Hope National Medical Center

Phyllis Zee, MD, PhDψ

Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University

NCCN Staff: Deborah A. Freedman-Cass, PhD, and Nicole R. McMillian, MS

KEY:

*Discussion Section Writing Committee

Specialties: †Medical Oncology; ÞInternal Medicine; €Pediatric Oncology; ξBone Marrow Transplantation; ωUrology; ≅Nutrition Science/Dietitian; ‡Hematology/Hematology Oncology; ΩGynecology/Gynecologic Oncology; ¶Surgery/Surgical Oncology; ψNeurology/Neuro-Oncology; #Nursing; ¥Patient Advocacy; £Supportive Care Including Palliative, Pain Management, Pastoral Care, and Oncology Social Work; ΦInfectious Diseases; λCardiology; εEpidemiology; θPsychiatry, Psychology, Including Health Behavior.

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