Wealth, Health Expenditure, and Cancer: A National Perspective

Authors:
Jad Chahoud From Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Division of Management Policy and Community Health, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas.

Search for other papers by Jad Chahoud in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MD
,
Adele Semaan From Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Division of Management Policy and Community Health, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas.

Search for other papers by Adele Semaan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MPH
, and
Alyssa Rieber From Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Division of Management Policy and Community Health, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas.

Search for other papers by Alyssa Rieber in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MD
Restricted access

Background: The US health care system is characterized by high health expenditures with penultimate outcomes. This ecological study evaluates the associations between wealth, health expenditure, and cancer outcomes at the state level. Methods: We extracted gross domestic product (GDP) and health expenditure per capita from the 2009 Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, respectively. Using data from the NCI, we retrieved colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer, and all-cancer age-adjusted rates and computed mortality/incidence (M/I) ratios. We used the Spearman's rank correlation to determine the association between the financial indicators and cancer outcomes, and we constructed geographic distribution maps to describe these associations. Results: GDP per capita significantly correlated with lower M/I ratios for all cancers, breast cancer, and CRC. As for health expenditure per capita, preliminary analysis highlighted a rift between the Northeastern and Southern states, which translated into worse breast and all-cancer outcomes in Southern states. Further analysis showed that higher health expenditure significantly correlated with decreased breast cancer M/I ratio. However, CRC outcomes were not significantly affected by health expenditure, nor were all-cancer outcomes. Conclusions: All cancers, breast cancer, and CRC outcomes significantly correlated with wealth, whereas only breast cancer correlated with higher health expenditure. Future research is needed to evaluate the potential role of policies in optimizing resource allocation in the states' efforts against CRC and minimizing disparities in interstate cancer outcomes.

Correspondence: Alyssa Rieber, MD, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Holcombe Boulevard, FC11.3066, Houston, TX 77030. E-mail: arieber@mdanderson.org

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplemental Material (PDF 111 KB)
  • Collapse
  • Expand
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 970 354 12
PDF Downloads 496 104 8
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0