Population-Based BRCA1/2 Testing in Ashkenazi Jews: Ready for Prime Time

Authors: Filipa Lynce MD and Claudine Isaacs MD
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Dr. Lynce is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. Her research is focused on novel therapies for breast cancer, health disparities, and hereditary breast cancer. She is the recipient of an ASCO Young Investigator Award and an ASPIRE Breast Cancer Research Award from Pfizer.

Dr. Isaacs is a Professor of Medicine and Oncology and Co-Director of the Breast Cancer Program at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University. She is also the Medical Director of the Jess and Mildred Fisher Center for Hereditary Cancer and Clinical Genomics Research. Dr. Isaacs' research interests include cancer risk assessment and medical management strategies for women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer. She has served as the Principal Investigator on federally funded grants focused on hereditary cancer and cancer screening. She has also served on a number of committees including the Cancer Education Committee at ASCO, the ASCO Scientific Program Committee, and as a member of the Breast Oncology Local Diseases Task Force of the Breast Steering Committee of the NCI.

The ideas and viewpoints expressed in this commentary are those of the author and do not necessarily represent any policy, position, or program of NCCN.

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