A Prospective Analysis of Plasma Adiponectin and Risk of Incident Cancer: The Dallas Heart Study

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Background: Adiponectin dysregulation is postulated to affect cancer risk via modulation of insulin resistance and inflammation. Epidemiologic studies evaluating this relationship have conflicting results and data from non-white cohorts are lacking. We examined the association between adiponectin and risk of cancer incidence in the multiethnic Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Methods: Participants enrolled in the DHS and known adiponectin values were included. Incident cancer cases were identified through a systematic linkage of the DHS and the Texas Cancer Registry. Univariate/multivariate analysis were performed to test the association between adiponectin and incident cancer after adjusting for age, diabetes status, gender, ethnicity, C-reactive protein level, smoking status, and body mass index. Adiponectin level was evaluated both as a continuous variable and in race/ethnicity specific quartiles. Results: Of 3444 individuals, there were 152 incident cancers. The study population was comprised of 44.4% men, and 51.05% were black. Baseline median adiponectin levels were 6.43 mcg/mL (interquartile range [IQR], 4.37–9.45 mcg/mL) in the incident cancer group versus 6.33 mcg/mL (IQR, 4.57–9.97 mcg/mL) in those without cancer. In multivariable analysis, adiponectin level was not associated with cancer incidence after adjusting for covariates. In analyses stratified by race/ethnic group, no association was observed in white, Hispanic, or African American subgroups. Conclusions: In this study of a predominant ethnic minority population, no association between adiponectin and cancer incidence was demonstrated. Despite preclinical rationale and confirmatory findings in other studies, this association may not replicate across all ethnic populations. Additional studies with trong minority representation are warranted to further examine this association.

Correspondence: Muhammad Shaalan Beg, MD, Division of Hematology/Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8852. E-mail: Muhammad.Beg@UTSouthwestern.edu
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