Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon malignancy involving lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are the 2 main types of HL. CHL accounts for most HL diagnosed in the Western countries. Chemotherapy or combined modality therapy, followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale), is the standard initial treatment for patients with newly diagnosed CHL. Brentuximab vedotin, a CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate, has produced encouraging results in the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. The potential long-term effects of treatment remain an important consideration, and long-term follow-up is essential after completion of treatment.

  • 1.

    SiegelRLMillerKDJemalA. Cancer statistics, 2015. CA Cancer J Clin2015;65:529.

  • 2.

    SwerdlowSHCampoEHarrisNL eds. WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. Edition 4. Lyon, France: IARC; 2008.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    CarbonePPKaplanHSMusshoffK. Report of the committee on hodgkin’s disease staging classification. Cancer Res1971;31:18601861.

  • 4.

    ChesonBDFisherRIBarringtonSF. Recommendations for initial evaluation, staging, and response assessment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: the Lugano classification. J Clin Oncol2014;32:30593068.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Henry-AmarMFriedmanSHayatM. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate predicts early relapse and survival in early-stage Hodgkin disease. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group. Ann Intern Med1991;114:361365.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    TubianaMHenry-AmarMHayatM. Prognostic significance of the number of involved areas in the early stages of Hodgkin’s disease. Cancer1984;54:885894.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    HasencleverDDiehlV. A prognostic score for advanced Hodgkin’s disease. International Prognostic Factors Project on Advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. N Engl J Med1998;339:15061514.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    ChesonBDHorningSJCoiffierB. Report of an international workshop to standardize response criteria for non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. NCI Sponsored International Working Group. J Clin Oncol1999;17:12441244.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    ChesonBDPfistnerBJuweidME. Revised response criteria for malignant lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2007;25:579586.

  • 10.

    JuweidMEStroobantsSHoekstraOS. Use of positron emission tomography for response assessment of lymphoma: consensus of the Imaging Subcommittee of International Harmonization Project in Lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2007;25:571578.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    ChesonBD. Role of functional imaging in the management of lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2011;29:18441854.

  • 12.

    MeignanMGallaminiAHaiounCPolliackA. Report on the Second International Workshop on interim positron emission tomography in lymphoma held in Menton, France, 8-9 April 2010. Leuk Lymphoma2010;51:21712180.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    MeignanMGallaminiAIttiE. Report on the Third International Workshop on interim positron emission tomography in lymphoma held in Menton, France, 26-27 September 2011 and Menton 2011 consensus. Leuk Lymphoma2012;53:18761881.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    BarringtonSFMikhaeelNGKostakogluL. Role of Imaging in the staging and response assessment of lymphoma: consensus of the International Conference on Malignant Lymphomas Imaging Working Group. J Clin Oncol2014;32:30483058.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    BarringtonSFQianWSomerEJ. Concordance between four European centres of PET reporting criteria designed for use in multicentre trials in Hodgkin lymphoma. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging2010;37:18241833.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    DannEJ. PET/CT adapted therapy in Hodgkin disease: current state of the art and future directions. Curr Oncol Rep2012;14:403410.

  • 17.

    GallaminiAKostakogluL. Interim FDG-PET in Hodgkin lymphoma: a compass for a safe navigation in clinical trials?Blood2012;120:49134920.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    RadfordJBarringtonSCounsellN. Involved field radiotherapy versus no further treatment in patients with clinical stages IA and IIA Hodgkin lymphoma and a ‘negative’ PET scan after 3 cycles ABVD. Results of the UK NCRI RAPID trial [abstract]. Blood2012;120:Abstract 547.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    BiggiAGallaminiAChauvieS. International validation study for interim PET in ABVD-treated, advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: interpretation criteria and concordance rate among reviewers. J Nucl Med2013;54:683690.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    JohnsonPFedericoMFossaA. Responses and chemotherapy dose adjustment determined by PET-CT imaging: first results from the international response adapted therapy in advanced hodgkin lymphoma (RATHL) study [abstract]. Hematol Oncol2013;31(Suppl 1):Abstract 126.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    GallaminiABarringtonSFBiggiA. The predictive role of interim positron emission tomography for Hodgkin lymphoma treatment outcome is confirmed using the interpretation criteria of the Deauville five-point scale. Haematologica2014;99:11071113.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    IsasiCRLuPBlaufoxMD. A metaanalysis of 18F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography in the staging and restaging of patients with lymphoma. Cancer2005;104:10661074.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    de WitMBohuslavizkiKHBuchertR. 18FDG-PET following treatment as valid predictor for disease-free survival in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol2001;12:2937.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    GuayCLepineMVerreaultJBenardF. Prognostic value of PET using 18F-FDG in Hodgkin’s disease for posttreatment evaluation. J Nucl Med2003;44:12251231.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    SherDJMauchPMVan Den AbbeeleA. Prognostic significance of mid- and post-ABVD PET imaging in Hodgkin’s lymphoma: the importance of involved-field radiotherapy. Ann Oncol2009;20:18481853.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    EngertAHaverkampHKobeC. Reduced-intensity chemotherapy and PET-guided radiotherapy in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HD15 trial): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 non-inferiority trial. Lancet2012;379:17911799.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27.

    MocikovaHObrtlikovaPVackovaBTrnenyM. Positron emission tomography at the end of first-line therapy and during follow-up in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma: a retrospective study. Ann Oncol2010;21:12221227.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28.

    El-GalalyTMylamKJBrownP. PET/CT surveillance in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma in first remission is associated with low positive predictive value and high costs. Haematologica201297:931936.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29.

    El-GalalyTCMylamKJBogstedM. Role of routine imaging in detecting recurrent lymphoma: a review of 258 patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma. Am J Hematol2014;89:575580.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30.

    HutchingsMMikhaeelNGFieldsPA. Prognostic value of interim FDG-PET after two or three cycles of chemotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma. Ann Oncol2005;16:11601168.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 31.

    LiJDabajaBReedV. Rationale for and preliminary results of proton beam therapy for mediastinal lymphoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys2011;81:167174.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    HoppeBSFlampouriSSuZ. Effective dose reduction to cardiac structures using protons compared with 3DCRT and IMRT in mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys2012;84:449455.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33.

    GirinskyTPichenotCBeaudreA. Is intensity-modulated radiotherapy better than conventional radiation treatment and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for mediastinal masses in patients with Hodgkin’s disease, and is there a role for beam orientation optimization and dose constraints assigned to virtual volumes?Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys2006;64:218226.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34.

    NiederCSchillSKneschaurekPMollsM. Influence of different treatment techniques on radiation dose to the LAD coronary artery. Radiat Oncol2007;2:2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 35.

    PaumierAGhalibafianMGilmoreJ. Dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys2012;82:15221527.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 36.

    FilippiARRagonaRFusellaM. Changes in breast cancer risk associated with different volumes, doses, and techniques in female Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated with supra-diaphragmatic radiation therapy. Pract Radiat Oncol2013;3:216222.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 37.

    CharpentierA-MConradTSykesJ. Active breathing control for patients receiving mediastinal radiation therapy for lymphoma: Impact on normal tissue dose. Pract Radiat Oncol2014;4:174180.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 38.

    FilippiARCiammellaPPivaC. Involved-site image-guided intensity modulated versus 3D conformal radiation therapy in early stage supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys2014;89:370375.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 39.

    VoongKRMcSpaddenKPinnixCC. Dosimetric advantages of a “butterfly” technique for intensity-modulated radiation therapy for young female patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Radiat Oncol2014;9:9494.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 40.

    CarawayNP. Strategies to diagnose lymphoproliferative disorders by fine-needle aspiration by using ancillary studies. Cancer2005;105:432442.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41.

    HehnSTGroganTMMillerTP. Utility of fine-needle aspiration as a diagnostic technique in lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2004;22:30463052.

  • 42.

    MedaBABussDHWoodruffRD. Diagnosis and subclassification of primary and recurrent lymphoma. The usefulness and limitations of combined fine-needle aspiration cytomorphology and flow cytometry. Am J Clin Pathol2000;113:688699.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 43.

    El-GalalyTCd’AmoreFMylamKJ. Routine bone marrow biopsy has little or no therapeutic consequence for positron emission tomography/computed tomography-staged treatment-naive patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2012;30:45084514.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 44.

    van der KaaijMAHeutteNMeijndersP. Premature ovarian failure and fertility in long-term survivors of Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Group and Groupe d’Etude des Lymphomes de l’Adulte Cohort Study. J Clin Oncol2012;30:291299.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 45.

    SieniawskiMReinekeTNogovaL. Fertility in male patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma treated with BEACOPP: a report of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). Blood2008;111:7176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 46.

    van der KaaijMAvan Echten-ArendsJSimonsAHKluin-NelemansHC. Fertility preservation after chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. Hematol Oncol2010;28:168179.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 47.

    TerenzianiMPivaLMeazzaC. Oophoropexy: a relevant role in preservation of ovarian function after pelvic irradiation. Fertil Steril2009;91:935e915936.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 48.

    DuhmkeEFranklinJPfreundschuhM. Low-dose radiation is sufficient for the noninvolved extended-field treatment in favorable early-stage Hodgkin’s disease: long-term results of a randomized trial of radiotherapy alone. J Clin Oncol2001;19:29052914.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 49.

    GustavssonAOstermanBCavallin-StahlE. A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Acta Oncol2003;42:589604.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 50.

    BonadonnaGBonfanteVVivianiS. ABVD plus subtotal nodal versus involved-field radiotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin’s disease: long-term results. J Clin Oncol2004;22:28352841.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 51.

    BartlettNLRosenbergSAHoppeRT. Brief chemotherapy, Stanford V, and adjuvant radiotherapy for bulky or advanced-stage Hodgkin’s disease: a preliminary report. J Clin Oncol1995;13:10801088.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 52.

    KoontzMZHorningSJBaliseR. Risk of therapy-related secondary leukemia in Hodgkin lymphoma: the Stanford University experience over three generations of clinical trials. J Clin Oncol2013;31:592598.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 53.

    AbuzetunJYLoberizaFVoseJ. The Stanford V regimen is effective in patients with good risk Hodgkin lymphoma but radiotherapy is a necessary component. Br J Haematol2009;144:531537.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 54.

    EngertAPlutschowAEichHT. Reduced treatment intensity in patients with early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma. N Engl J Med2010;363:640652.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 55.

    AdvaniRHHoppeRTBaerD. Efficacy of abbreviated Stanford V chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: mature results of the G4 trial. Ann Oncol2013;24:10441048.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 56.

    Rueda DominguezAMarquezAGumaJ. Treatment of stage I and II Hodgkin’s lymphoma with ABVD chemotherapy: results after 7 years of a prospective study. Ann Oncol2004;15:17981804.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 57.

    StrausDJPortlockCSQinJ. Results of a prospective randomized clinical trial of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) followed by radiation therapy (RT) versus ABVD alone for stages I, II, and IIIA nonbulky Hodgkin disease. Blood2004;104:34833489.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 58.

    MeyerRMGospodarowiczMKConnorsJM. Randomized comparison of ABVD chemotherapy with a strategy that includes radiation therapy in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. J Clin Oncol2005;23:46344642.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 59.

    MeyerRMGospodarowiczMKConnorsJM. ABVD alone versus radiation-based therapy in limited-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma. N Engl J Med2012;366:399408.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 60.

    FermeCEghbaliHMeerwaldtJH. Chemotherapy plus involved-field radiation in early-stage Hodgkin’s disease. N Engl J Med2007;357:19161927.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 61.

    RaemaekersJMMAndréMPEFedericoM. Omitting radiotherapy in early positron emission tomography-negative stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with an increased risk of early relapse: clinical results of the preplanned interim analysis of the randomized EORTC/LYSA/FIL H10 trial. J Clin Oncol2014;32:11881194.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 62.

    EngertASchillerPJostingA. Involved-field radiotherapy is equally effective and less toxic compared with extended-field radiotherapy after four cycles of chemotherapy in patients with early-stage unfavorable Hodgkin’s lymphoma: results of the HD8 trial of the German Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Study Group. J Clin Oncol2003;21:36013608.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 63.

    SasseSKlimmBGorgenH. Comparing long-term toxicity and efficacy of combined modality treatment including extended- or involved-field radiotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol2012;23:29532959.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 64.

    EichHTDiehlVGörgenH. Intensified chemotherapy and dose-reduced involved-field radiotherapy in patients with early unfavorable hodgkin’s lymphoma: final analysis of the German Hodgkin Study Group HD11 trial. J Clin Oncol2010;28:41994206.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 65.

    HorningSJHoppeRTBreslinS. Stanford V and radiotherapy for locally extensive and advanced Hodgkin’s disease: mature results of a prospective clinical trial. J Clin Oncol2002;20:630637.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 66.

    AversaSMSalvagnoLSoraruM. Stanford V regimen plus consolidative radiotherapy is an effective therapeutic program for bulky or advanced-stage Hodgkin’s disease. Acta Haematol2004;112:141147.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 67.

    Edwards-BennettSMJacksLMMoskowitzCH. Stanford V program for locally extensive and advanced Hodgkin lymphoma: the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience. Ann Oncol2010;21:574581.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 68.

    HoskinPJLowryLHorwichA. Randomized comparison of the stanford V regimen and ABVD in the treatment of advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: United Kingdom National Cancer Research Institute Lymphoma Group Study ISRCTN 64141244. J Clin Oncol2009;27:53905396.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 69.

    GordonLIHongFFisherRI. Randomized phase III trial of ABVD versus Stanford V with or without radiation therapy in locally extensive and advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: an Intergroup study coordinated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (E2496). J Clin Oncol2013;31:684691.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 70.

    von TresckowBPlutschowAFuchsM. Dose-intensification in early unfavorable Hodgkin’s lymphoma: final analysis of the German Hodgkin Study Group HD14 trial. J Clin Oncol2012;30:907913.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 71.

    DeVitaVTJrSimonRMHubbardSM. Curability of advanced Hodgkin’s disease with chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up of MOPP-treated patients at the National Cancer Institute. Ann Intern Med1980;92:587595.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 72.

    CanellosGPAndersonJRPropertKJ. Chemotherapy of advanced Hodgkin’s disease with MOPP, ABVD, or MOPP alternating with ABVD. N Engl J Med1992;327:14781484.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 73.

    DugganDBPetroniGRJohnsonJL. Randomized comparison of ABVD and MOPP/ABV hybrid for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin’s disease: report of an intergroup trial. J Clin Oncol2003;21:607614.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 74.

    JohnsonPWMRadfordJACullenMH. Comparison of ABVD and alternating or hybrid multidrug regimens for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: results of the United Kingdom Lymphoma Group LY09 Trial (ISRCTN97144519). J Clin Oncol2005;23:92089218.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 75.

    JohnsonPWMSydesMRHancockBW. Consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: survival data from the UKLG LY09 randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN97144519). J Clin Oncol2010:33523359.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 76.

    DiehlVFranklinJPfreundschuhM. Standard and increased-dose BEACOPP chemotherapy compared with COPP-ABVD for advanced Hodgkin’s disease. N Engl J Med2003;348:23862395.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 77.

    EngertADiehlVFranklinJ. Escalated-dose BEACOPP in the treatment of patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: 10 years of follow-up of the GHSG HD9 study. J Clin Oncol2009;27:45484554.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 78.

    BorchmannPHaverkampHDiehlV. Eight cycles of escalated-dose BEACOPP compared with four cycles of escalated-dose BEACOPP followed by four cycles of baseline-dose BEACOPP with or without radiotherapy in patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: final analysis of the HD12 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group. J Clin Oncol2011;29:42344242.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 79.

    FedericoMLuminariSIannittoE. ABVD compared with BEACOPP compared with CEC for the initial treatment of patients with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: results from the HD2000 Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio dei Linfomi trial. J Clin Oncol2009;27:805811.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 80.

    VivianiSZinzaniPLRambaldiA. ABVD versus BEACOPP for Hodgkin’s lymphoma when high-dose salvage is planned. N Engl J Med2011;365:203212.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 81.

    CardePPKarraschMFortpiedC. ABVD (8 cycles) versus BEACOPP (4 escalated cycles => 4 baseline) in stage III-IV high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma (HL): first results of EORTC 20012 Intergroup randomized phase III clinical trial [abstract]. J Clin Oncol2012;30:Abstract 8002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 82.

    MounierNBricePBolognaS. ABVD (8 cycles) versus BEACOPP (4 escalated cycles >/=4 baseline): final results in stage III-IV low-risk Hodgkin lymphoma (IPS 0-2) of the LYSA H34 randomized trialdagger. Ann Oncol2014;25:16221628.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 83.

    MerliFLuminariSMammiC. Long-term follow-up analysis of HD2000 trial comparing ABVD versus BEACOPP versus Copp/EBV/CAD in patients with newly diagnosed advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a study from the Fondazione Italiana Linfomi [abstract]. Blood2014;124:Abstract 499.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 84.

    FabianCJMansfieldCMDahlbergS. Low-dose involved field radiation after chemotherapy in advanced Hodgkin disease. A Southwest Oncology Group randomized study. Ann Intern Med1994;120:903912.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 85.

    AlemanBMRaemaekersJMTomisicR. Involved-field radiotherapy for patients in partial remission after chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys2007;67:1930.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 86.

    LaskarSGuptaTVimalS. Consolidation radiation after complete remission in Hodgkin’s disease following six cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine chemotherapy: is there a need?J Clin Oncol2004;22:6268.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 87.

    CarellaAMBelleiMBriceP. High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation versus conventional therapy for patients with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma responding to front-line therapy: long-term results. Haematologica2009;94:146148.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 88.

    ProctorSJMackieMDawsonA. A population-based study of intensive multi-agent chemotherapy with or without autotransplant for the highest risk Hodgkin’s disease patients identified by the Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group (SNLG) prognostic index. A Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group study (SNLG HD III). Eur J Cancer2002;38:795806.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 89.

    SweetenhamJWTaghipourGMilliganD. High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell rescue for patients with Hodgkin’s disease in first relapse after chemotherapy: results from the EBMT. Lymphoma Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant1997;20:745752.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 90.

    BiermanPJAndersonJRFreemanMB. High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic rescue for Hodgkin’s disease patients following first relapse after chemotherapy. Ann Oncol1996;7:151156.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 91.

    RodriguezMACabanillasFCHagemeisterFB. A phase II trial of mesna/ifosfamide, mitoxantrone and etoposide for refractory lymphomas. Ann Oncol1995;6:609611.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 92.

    ChlVPP therapy for Hodgkin’s disease: experience of 960 patients. The International ChlVPP Treatment Group. Ann Oncol1995;6:167172.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 93.

    ColwillRCrumpMCoutureF. Mini-BEAM as salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s disease before intensive therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. J Clin Oncol1995;13:396402.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 94.

    FehnigerTALarsonSTrinkausK. A phase 2 multicenter study of lenalidomide in relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood2011;118:51195125.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 95.

    AvigdorABulvikSLeviI. Two cycles of escalated BEACOPP followed by four cycles of ABVD utilizing early-interim PET/CT scan is an effective regimen for advanced high-risk Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol2010;21:126132.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 96.

    MauchPNgAAlemanB. Report from the Rockefellar Foundation sponsored international workshop on reducing mortality and improving quality of life in long-term survivors of Hodgkin’s disease. Eur J Haematol Suppl2005:6876.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 97.

    LinchDCWinfieldDGoldstoneAH. Dose intensification with autologous bone-marrow transplantation in relapsed and resistant Hodgkin’s disease: results of a BNLI randomised trial. Lancet1993;341:10511054.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 98.

    SchmitzNPfistnerBSextroM. Aggressive conventional chemotherapy compared with high-dose chemotherapy with autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation for relapsed chemosensitive Hodgkin’s disease: a randomised trial. Lancet2002;359:20652071.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 99.

    PhillipsJKSpearingRLDaviesJM. VIM-D salvage chemotherapy in Hodgkin’s disease. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol1990;27:161163.

  • 100.

    AparicioJSeguraAGarceraS. ESHAP is an active regimen for relapsing Hodgkin’s disease. Ann Oncol1999;10:593595.

  • 101.

    MartinAFernandez-JimenezMCCaballeroMD. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with Mini-BEAM as salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s disease. Br J Haematol2001;113:161171.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 102.

    MoskowitzCHNimerSDZelenetzAD. A 2-step comprehensive high-dose chemoradiotherapy second-line program for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin disease: analysis by intent to treat and development of a prognostic model. Blood2001;97:616623.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 103.

    JostingARudolphCReiserM. Time-intensified dexamethasone/cisplatin/cytarabine: an effective salvage therapy with low toxicity in patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin’s disease. Ann Oncol2002;13:16281635.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 104.

    AbaliHUrunYOksuzogluB. Comparison of ICE (ifosfamide-carboplatin-etoposide) versus DHAP (cytosine arabinoside-cisplatin-dexamethasone) as salvage chemotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma. Cancer Invest2008;26:401406.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 105.

    BartlettNLNiedzwieckiDJohnsonJL. Gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (GVD), a salvage regimen in relapsed Hodgkin’s lymphoma: CALGB 59804. Ann Oncol2007;18:10711079.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 106.

    GopalAKPressOWShustovAR. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine, carboplatin, dexamethasone, and rituximab in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma: a prospective multi-center phase II study by the Puget Sound Oncology Consortium. Leuk Lymphoma2010;51:15231529.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 107.

    MoskowitzAJHamlinPAPeralesM-A. Phase II study of bendamustine in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2013;31:456460.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 108.

    JohnstonPBInwardsDJColganJP. A phase II trial of the oral mTOR inhibitor everolimus in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma. Am J Hematol2010;85:320324.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 109.

    JostingANogovaLFranklinJ. Salvage radiotherapy in patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a retrospective analysis from the German Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group. J Clin Oncol2005;23:15221529.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 110.

    YounesABartlettNLLeonardJP. Brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) for relapsed CD30-positive lymphomas. N Engl J Med2010;363:18121821.

  • 111.

    YounesAGopalAKSmithSE. Results of a pivotal phase II study of brentuximab vedotin for patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. J Clin Oncol2012;30:21832189.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 112.

    GopalAKChenRSmithSE. Durable remissions in a pivotal phase 2 study of brentuximab vedotin in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood2015;125:12361243.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 113.

    ChenRWPalmerJMartinP. Results of a phase II trial of brentuximab vedotin as first line salvage therapy in relapsed/refractory HL prior to AHCT [abstract]. Blood2014;124:Abstract 501.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 114.

    EvensAMAltmanJKMittalBB. Phase I/II trial of total lymphoid irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol2007;18:679688.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 115.

    MoskowitzCHKewalramaniTNimerSD. Effectiveness of high dose chemoradiotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with biopsy-proven primary refractory Hodgkin’s disease. Br J Haematol2004;124:645652.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 116.

    SirohiBCunninghamDPowlesR. Long-term outcome of autologous stem-cell transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol2008;19:13121319.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 117.

    MoskowitzCHNadamaneeAMassziT. The Aethera trial: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study of brentuximab vedotin in the treatment of patients at risk of progression following autologous stem cell transplant for Hodgkin lymphoma [abstract]. Blood2014;124:Abstract 673.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 160 160 10
PDF Downloads 44 44 5
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0