Sleep Disruption in Breast Cancer Patients and Survivors

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  • a From the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California; APHP, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; INSERM UMRS776 “Biological Rhythms and Cancers,” Villejuif, France; Laboratory of Nutrition and Integrative Neurobiology (NutriNeuro), INRA 1286, Bordeaux, France; and University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
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Sleep disruption is prevalent in patients and survivors of breast cancer. Most patients undergoing chemotherapy will experience transient sleep disruption, and nearly 60% will have chronic sleep problems. Numerous factors contribute to sleep disruption in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Sleep disruption is a consequence of several biological alterations, including circadian disruption and immune and metabolic deregulations. These systems also play significant roles in the control and progression of breast cancer. Sleep disruption is associated with many side effects and psychiatric and medical comorbidities. This article discusses the relationship between stress and posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and fatigue, and how sleep disturbance might be the cause or consequence of these disorders. Current evidence for management of sleep disturbance in breast cancer and high chronic use of hypnotic medication in this population is also discussed. Finally, the differences in management of sleep disturbance during acute cancer care and during the survivorship phase are discussed. More research is needed on accurate and timely assessment of sleep disturbance associated with breast cancer, and additional tailored approaches for the management of sleep problems in breast cancer should be developed.

Correspondence: Oxana Palesh, PhD, MPH, 401 Quarry Road, Office 2318, Stanford, CA 94305-5718. E-mail: opalesh@stanford.edu
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